Contracts are agreements that are legally binding between two or more parties. The Statute of Frauds is a law that requires certain types of contracts to be in writing and signed in order to be enforceable. The purpose of this law is to prevent fraudulent claims that can arise from oral agreements that are difficult to prove.

However, not all contracts fall under the purview of the Statute of Frauds. In this article, we will explore which of these contracts would not be subject to the Statute of Frauds.

1. Contracts for the sale of goods under $500: The Statute of Frauds applies to contracts for the sale of goods over $500. Therefore, any contract for the sale of goods under $500 would not be subject to the Statute of Frauds.

2. Contracts that can be performed within one year: Any contract that can be performed within one year from the date of the agreement does not fall under the Statute of Frauds.

3. Contracts where one party has already performed: If one of the parties to a contract has already performed their obligations under the contract, then the Statute of Frauds does not apply.

4. Contracts between merchants: Contracts made between merchants in the ordinary course of business are not subject to the Statute of Frauds.

5. Contracts for services: Unlike contracts for the sale of goods, contracts for services are not subject to the Statute of Frauds.

It is important to note that while these contracts may not be subject to the Statute of Frauds, it is still a good idea to have them in writing to avoid any confusion or disputes that may arise in the future.

In conclusion, the Statute of Frauds is an important law that governs the enforceability of certain types of contracts. However, not all contracts fall under its purview. Contracts for the sale of goods under $500, contracts that can be performed within one year, contracts where one party has already performed, contracts between merchants, and contracts for services are all examples of contracts that would not be subject to the Statute of Frauds.